NewLearningGuide .gif”>.gif”>.jpg”> School of Social Sciences and Psychology Disciplines of

NewLearningGuide
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School of Social Sciences and Psychology
Disciplines
of Policing

LEARNING GUIDE
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© University of Western Sydney, 2012

Template Designer: Adelma M. Hills

Template Author: Martin Daly

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101568-Legislation, courts and policing

2013-Autumn

TABLE OF CONTENTS

UNIT WEEKLY
SCHEDULE……………………………………………………………………………….2

1.0 UNIT
DETAILS, STAFFING, AND HELP…………………………………………………………….4

1.1 Unit details………………………………………………………………………………………..4
1.2 What to do if you need help?…………………………………………………………………..4

2.0 UNIT
CONTENT……………………………………………………………………………………..5

2.1 Handbook summary……………………………………………………………………………..5

2.2 Unit content………………………………………………………………………………………5
2.3 Mode of delivery…………………………………………………………………………………6

2.4 Attendance requirements and workload…………………………………………………….10
2.5 Changes to unit in response to
student feedback…………………………………………..10
3.0 UNIT
LEARNING OUTCOMES…………………………………………………………………….10
4.0 HOW DO
ACTIVITIES AND ASSESSMENTS RELATE TO LEARNING OUTCOMES?……………10

5.0
ASSESSMENT OVERVIEW…………………………………………………………………………10

6.0
TEXTBOOK(S) AND RESOURCES………………………………………………………………….11
6.1 Required textbook(s)…………………………………………………………………………..11
6.2 Readings, resources, and web-links…………………………………………………………..11

6.3 Referencing style guide………………………………………………………………………..12

6.4 Other Resources………………………………………………………………………………..13
6.5 Other……………………………………………………………………………………………..13

ASSESSMENT
1: COURT OBSERVATION REPORT……………………………………………………14

ASSESSMENT
2: CASE STUDY ANALYSIS…………………………………………………………….16
ASSESSMENT
3: FINAL EXAMINATION………………………………………………………………18

ASSESSMENT
4: NO FOURTH ASSESSMENTNO FOURTH ASSESSMENT…………………………..18

LIST OF ATTACHMENTS

Social Science
Student Resources

Cover sheets for Assessments
1 and 2

Cover Sheets 101568

.gif”>UNIT WEEKLY SCHEDULE

Week

Week Starts

Lectures

Tutorials

Readings and Assessments

Introduction

No tutorial

Read P.1 to P.6 of text.

Ch 1. The Court System

Introduction

1

25/02/2013

Ch 2. The Adversary System

Ch 1. The Court System

The Rule of Law

Ch 2. The Adversary System

Teaching

Australian Indigenous Law

The Rule of Law

Australian Indigenous Law

Ch 3. The Legal Profession in

Introduction

Ch 3 The Legal Profession in

4/03/2013

Court

The Court System

Court

2

The Rule of Law

The Adversary System

Teaching

Australian Indigenous Law

3

11/03/2013

Ch 4. Court Officers and Other

The Legal Profession in Court

Ch 4. Court Officers and Other

Participants

Participants

Teaching

4

18/03/2013

Ch. 5. Courtroom Environment

Court Officers and Other

Ch. 5. Courtroom Environment

Participants

Teaching

No lecture at Bankstown or

Courtroom Environment

Assessment 2 ‘Case Study’
will

Penrith.

be posted on vUWS in Week 5

Tutes will be conducted at

Ch. 6 and 7. Courtroom

Bankstown and Penrith.

Protocol and Procedure. .

5

25/03/2013

Pre recorded Lecture and Power

Stages of Evidence. The

Teaching

Point lecture on vUWS.

Prosecution Case.

Ch. 6 and 7. Courtroom Protocol

Larceny.

and Procedure. Stages of

Evidence. The Prosecution Case.

Larceny/LEPRA

Week 6. EASTER MONDAY

On Line Activity

Ch.8. Stages of Evidence. The

No lecture or tute at Bankstown

Courtroom Protocol and

Defence Case.

or Penrith.

Procedure. Stages of Evidence.

Larceny/LEPRA

6

1/04/2013

Pre recorded Lecture and Power

The Prosecution Case.

Point lecture on vUWS.

Larceny/LEPRA

Teaching

Ch.8. Stages of Evidence. The

Defence Case.

Larceny/LEPRA

No lecture at Bankstown or

Stages of Evidence. The Defence

Ch. 9 and 10. Sentencing and

Penrith.

Case.

Appeals.

Tutes will be conducted at

Larceny/LEPRA

8/04/2013

Bankstown and Penrith.

7

Teaching

Pre recorded Lecture and Power

Point lecture on vUWS.

Ch. 9 and 10. Sentencing and

Appeals.

15/04/2013

INTRA SESSION BREAK:

INTRA SESSION BREAK:

INTRA
SESSION BREAK

NO LECTURES

NO TUTORIALS

8

Intra-Session

Break

Ch.11 and 12. Conduct Before

Sentencing and Appeals.

ASSESSMENT 1due at 4pm on

22/04/2013

and after a Court Case.

Friday, 26 April 2013.

9

Awarding Costs Against Police.

Ch.11 and 12. Conduct Before

Teaching

and after a Court Case.

Awarding Costs Against Police

10

29/04/2013

Ch.13 Coronial Inquests and

Conduct Before and after a

Ch.13 Coronial Inquests and

Inquiries in New South Wales

Court Case. Awarding Costs

Inquiries in New South Wales.

Teaching

Against Police.

Learning Guide

2013-Autumn

101568-Legislation, courts and policing

Page 2 of 18

11

6/05/2013

Domestic Violence)

Coronial Inquests and Inquiries

Domestic Violence. See

Teaching

in New South Wales

Powerpoint on vUWS

12

13/05/2013

Forensic Science in Courts.

Domestic Violence

Forensic Science in Courts

Teaching

Guest Lecturer Glenn Porter

Police Evidence.

Revision

ASSESSMENT 2due at 4pm on

13

20/05/2013

Supreme Court of New South

Friday, 24th May 2013.

Teaching

Wales Court of Criminal Appeal:

Taouk (1992) 65 A Crim R 387

14

27/05/2013

Self Directed Learning-Revision

Self Directed Learning-Revision

Self Directed Learning-Revision

Teaching

15

3/06/2013

STUVAC Study Vacation:Study for final
examination, which will

be conducted during the UWS

STUVAC

Formal Examination Period

16-18

10/06/2013

FORMAL EXAMINATION PERIOD

Exam Period

Learning Guide 2013-Autumn 101568-Legislation, courts and policing Page 3 of 18

1.0 .gif”>UNIT DETAILS, STAFFING, AND HELP

1.1 Unit details
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Unit Coordinator:

Dr Michael
Kennedy

Unit level:2

Credit points:10

Campus:

Bankstown
(Monday), Penrith (Tuesday)

Prerequisites:

None

Co-requisites:

None

Incompatible unit(s):

400294 Law, Evidence and Procedure

Enrolment restrictions:

None

Assumed knowledge:

None

Legislative restrictions:

None

Essential equipment:

You must have access to the internet for this
unit, preferably high speed

broadband.
You can access the IT computer laboratories if you do not have this

access at home.

Online requirements:

Regular
access to the unit’s vUWS site is essential. Students need to check
each of

their
vUWS sites and email account at least once a week, and preferably every 2

or 3 days, to check for any email,
announcements, or new unit materials,

including
any variations to the Learning Guide that might be needed.

Teaching staff:

Bankstown

Kate
Linklater

link2kat@police.nsw.gov.au

Tom
Staciwa

Stac1tho@police.nsw.gov.au

Penrith

Darren Lewandowski

lewa1dar@police.nsw.gov.au

Bradley
Goodhart

Contact and

good2brad@police.nsw.gov.au

consultation:

Dr
Michael Kennedy

Building
P, Room P.G.12, Kingswood Campus

Phone:
4736 0868 or 0418 669 584

Email: m.kennedy@uws.edu.au

You may email or contact Michael Kennedy by phone at any time. Please
use your UWS email account or it is likely your contact will end up in my email
SPAM. Michael will always respond to you within a day or two. Alternatively you
can contact Michael for an office appointment. Please remember there are almost
900 students in the Policing programme and resolving matters by phone or email
is best practice.

Consultation
times:
Bankstown Monday 2pm to 5pm
Penrith Tuesday
1pm – 5pm
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1.2 What to do if you need help?

Step 1:Read thisLearning Guide(including attachments,
especially theSocial Science Student Resources

Step 2:Check the unit vUWS site for the information you need and engage with
other students on the discussionboard.

Step 3:Direct your student enquiries tossap@uws.edu.au

Note:You are expected to
read and be familiar with the subject learning guide and the electronic
handbook forBach Pol 1662 with regards to administrative
questions, before contacting any member of staff. Staff may not

Learning Guide 2013-Autumn 101568-Legislation, courts and policing Page 4 of 18

respond to emails, questions, or requests
for help where answers are readily obtainable in the Learning Guide, electronic
handbookor attachments, or through links provided to other sources of
information.

For advice regarding the subject matter of the unit, consult
your tutor during class time, or consult with the Unit Coordinator according to
the Consultation details in the previous section. Students are expected to be
adequately prepared when they seek advice from teaching staff, having done
sufficient background work themselves, and with clear questions rather than
vague requests about what to do.

Be aware of
your rights and responsibilities:

You must be aware of the key UWS policies and information affecting
students, found at this link: http://www.uws.edu.au/learning_teaching/learning_and_teaching/office_of_the_pro-vice-chancellor/key_policies_and_information_affecting_students

First year students:First year
students experiencing difficulties, or needing assistance or support to adjust
toUniversity life, should consult with
the first year advisor.

Make
sure you are an informed adult-learner:

If you are a new student coming straight from school, please
understand that being a university student is very different to being a school
student. Your first day at University is the start of your professional career
where you take responsibility for yourself as a professional adult learner. To
give yourself the best chance of having a satisfying University experience, and
to maximise your prospects for success, you need to take control of your own
learning. This means ensuring you are as informed as possible at all times and
not reliant on asking for help from others – except, of course, when you have
exhausted all other options.

It is very important, therefore – and this applies to all students –
that in the first week of semester you set sufficient time aside to read this
Learning Guide and all its attachments fully and carefully. You need to ensure
you are completely familiar with the requirements of the unit and all the
support services and sources of information available to you.
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2.0 UNIT CONTENT

2.1 Handbook summary
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This unit introduces students to the adversarial system, the
legislative context of everyday policing, and the different forms of state and
federal courts. Itincludes an emphasis on police powers (NSW and elsewhere),
summary and indictable offences, and the role of enforcement and discretion. In
particular alternative resolution, specialist courts and Australian Indigenous
Law are described and their role and function analysed. This unit is of value
to students in policing, criminology, law, and community welfare.
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2.2 Unit content

• The adversarial system (exception of the coroner’s court)
• Court processes (observation field trip)
• The court system (Actus Reus and Mens Rea; indictable and summary
offences; alternative resolutions; specialist courts;)
• Australian Indigenous Law
• Types of law; Acts, statutes (state, inter-state; commonwealth)
• Law Enforcement (Powers and Responsibilities) Act 2002 (LEPRA) (NSW)
(rule of law; enforcement and discretion)
• Law and its interpretation social disorder
• Law and its interpretation property crime
• Law and its interpretation prohibited drugs
• Law and its interpretation crimes of violence (homicide; family
violence; armed robbery; assault)
• Law and its interpretation Child Protection Act
• Law and its interpretation fraud and computer/electronic crime
• Topical examples such as anti-terrorism laws, bike gang laws etc.

Learning Guide 2013-Autumn 101568-Legislation, courts and policing Page 5 of 18

.gif”>.gif”>2.3 Mode of delivery

The unit is delivered by means of a weekly 1hr lecture and 1hr
tutorial and on line discussion and activity via vUWS.

Weekly Topics, Tutorial Activities &
Readings.

WEEK 1:Ch 1. The
Court System; Ch 2. The Adversary System; The Rule of Law; Australian
Indigenous Law.

Online Activity

• Go on line to
Google and locate a copy of Dicey’s ‘Rule of Law’. There are three parts to
this philosophy. Research whether the first part of the Rule of Law… The law
applies equally to all in society; nobody is above the law… relate only to
enforcement or does it consider discretion?

• Go to the following
web site and comment on the vUWS discussion board. http://www.creativespirits.info/aboriginalculture/law/.
The discussion requires sensible comments that are evidencebased and not dogmatic. Try to place yourself in the
shoes of an Aboriginal male or female. (If you are not certain what dogmatic
means buy the Dictionary of Sociology in the bookshop)

Use discussion content for tute in Week
2.

WEEK 2:Ch 3. The
Legal Profession in Court.

Online Activity

• Go tohttp://www.lsc.sa.gov.au/dsh/ch02s01.php. On the vUWS site discuss the Rule of
Law and information from the URL site.

On vUWS discussion board discuss the positive
and negative experiences that you have had with the legal establishment.

Bring your printed research to the
tutorial in Week 3.

Tutorial Exercise

•
Reflect on
this weeks readings. Are lawyers accountable?

•
Does the
rule of law appear to be applied evenly to members of the legal profession?

•
Can a
lawyer continue to practice law with a criminal conviction?

•
How is the
judiciary appointed. Is it a merit based and transparent process?

WEEK 3: Ch 4. Court Officers and Other
Participants

Online Activity View the URL site below.

•

Does the court room design in Australia
serve the best interests of all participants?

Discuss on vUWS discussion board.

Bring your printed research to the
tutorial in Week 4.

Tutorial Exercise

•
Are
courtrooms designed to serve the interests of all stakeholders?

•
Consider
the following.

Learning
Guide 2013-Autumn 101568-Legislation, courts and policing Page 6 of 18

•
Entry and
exit protocols.

•
The dress
of the legal profession.

WEEK 4:Ch. 5. Courtroom Environment

Online Activity View the URL site below.

•

•

Reflect on both utube sites. Using data from Week 1. http://www.creativespirits.info/aboriginalculture/law/
discuss content.

Discuss on vUWS discussion board

Print summary and bring to tutorial in Week 5.

Tutorial Exercise

Discussion

•
Is the
Australian legal system about ‘a search for the truth’ or ‘ the better
argument’?

•
Should
officials in the criminal justice system, including police, respect different
legal systems and cultures?

WEEK 5: Ch. 6 and 7. Courtroom Protocol and Procedure. Stages of
Evidence. The Prosecution Case. LEPRA and Larceny.

Online Activity View the URL site below.

•
What are
the proofs of Larceny/(Shoplifting)

•
Pretend that as a police officer you are called to the incident on
utube. Using LEPRA requirements do you think it is necessary to arrest the
suspect?

•
If you do
arrest what does LEPRA require you to do?

•
Should you
consider cautioning the suspect?

•
If this
person was a close relative or parent what would you do?

Print summary and bring to tutorial in Week 6.

Tutorial Exercise

• Discuss your
online summary of findings in class and why you consider them to be important
with regards to Courts and Court Process. The proofs of larceny, rule of law
and LEPRA.

Week 6: Ch.8. Stages of Evidence. The Defence Case.

EASTER MONDAY No lecture or tute at Bankstown
or Penrith.
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Power Point lecture on vUWS.

Stages of Evidence. The Defence Case. Larceny/LEPRA

Online Activity View the URL site below.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4QsWCFIi6aY

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jNr5Par6RKc

Reflect on utube content. Then discuss in
terms of discretion and enforcement on vUWS discussion board.

Learning Guide 2013-Autumn 101568-Legislation, courts and policing Page 7 of 18

NO TUTES
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WEEK 7: Ch. 9 and 10. Sentencing and
Appeals.

Online Activity

•
Search the websites of various local newspapers in New South Wales for
a range of drink driving sentences and compare.

•
http://www.armstronglegal.com.au/web/page/drink_driving_penalties_dui_penalties

Compare to
penalties mentioned in URL site above and discuss
content on vUWS
discussion board. Are the penaltiesconsistent? Print summary and bring to tutorial in Week 9.

Tutorial Exercise

Debate whether sentencing should be by precedent or should it be
codified. Codified would mean that all persons convicted of an offence would
get the same penalty. Include in this discussion whether or not victim impact
statements should be used in a sentencing procedure.

Should police be
more concerned about the rights of the accused person or the rights of the
victim? If there is time discuss in class.

Week 8: NO LECTURES OR TUTORIALS – INTRA
SEMESTER BREAK

WEEK 9:Ch.11 and
12. Conduct Before and after a Court Case.

Online Activity View the URL site below.

http://www.theage.com.au/national/top-judge-blasts-afp-terror-probe-20100330-rbhu.html

• Reflect on utube content then discuss
discus the following on the vUWS
discussion board

Print individual contribution to this
discussion and bring to tutorial in Week 10.

Tutorial Exercise

Continue online debate in class.

WEEK 10:Ch.13
Coronial Inquests and Inquiries in New South Wales

Online Activity

•
Go to the
following web site http://englishplus.com/grammar/00000207.htm

•
What is
‘disintereted’ in terms of a police investigation?

Learning
Guide 2013-Autumn 101568-Legislation, courts and policing Page 8 of 18

•
Go to the
following web site http://www.coroners.lawlink.nsw.gov.au/coroners/findings.html

•
Open the
file of Bryant Harmony.

Discuss the
Coroners Report re Bryant Harmony on vUWS discussion board.

Print individual contribution to the
discussion and bring to tutorial.

Tutorial Exercise

Using the ‘rule of law philosophy’ discus
in Week 11 Tute:

How can police remain ‘disinterested’ in
these types of investigations?

What would be some conflicts of interest?

WEEK 11 : Domestic Violence.

Online Activity

•
Go on line
to BOSCAR http://www.bocsar.nsw.gov.au/

• Compare the data
for Domestic Violence over the last five years and discuss on vUWS. Print out
your discussion board contribution and take to Week 12 tute.

Tutorial Exercise

Discuss the following.

Is Domestic Violence Legislation in
contradiction to the ‘rule of law’?

Is being served with an order a criminal
offence?

Why is the legislation so necessary?

WEEK 12: Forensic Science in Courts

Online Activity

Conduct some basic on line research.

•
How long
does it normally take for police to get the results of a DNA test?

•
Is the
consistent with the image presented by drama Industry?

Discuss finding on vUWS discussion board.

If time permits after revision discuss
findings in Week 13 Tute.

Tutorial Exercise

Revision.

If time permits after revision discuss on
line activity findings in Week 13 Tute.

Week 13: Police Evidence. Supreme Court
of New South Wales Court of Criminal Appeal: Taouk (1992) 65 A Crim R 387

Police Evidence.
Supreme Court of New South Wales Court of Criminal Appeal: Taouk
(1992) 65 A Crim R 387

Online Activity

Discuss on vUWS the essential reading on
vUWS discussion board.

•Supreme Court of
New South Wales Court of Criminal Appeal: Taouk (1992) 65 A Crim R 387.http://www.austlii.edu.au/au/other/crime/Taouk.html

Learning
Guide 2013-Autumn 101568-Legislation, courts and policing Page 9 of 18

Tutorial Exercise

Revision. (If time permits after revision discuss Week 12 lecture
findings)

WEEK 14:

No Lecture or Tute

SELF DIRECTED LEARNING:
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2.4 Attendance requirements and workload

This is a core unit for Bach Pol. In order to maximise knowledge
acquisition students are expected to attend all lectures and tutorials and to
participate to the best of their ability in all class activities. If you choose
not to attend and participate in sessions regularly this may seriously
undermine your ability to complete the unit and possibly the degree in a
satisfactory manner. Attendance and participation may be reviewed in the
assessment of any requests for extensions or Special Consideration. You should
advise the Unit Coordinator or your tutor if on a regular basis you are unable
to attend a lecture or tutorial due to illness or misadventure.

This unit is worth 10 credit points, indicating that success in the
unit requires at least 10 hours work per week. Three hours will be
lecture/tutorial/on line activity time and the remaining 7 hours should be
devoted to reading and study, assessment preparation, and revision. In this
unit you will need to devote much of this time to reading the textbook and reading
materials.
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2.5 Changes to unit in response to student feedback
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3.0 UNIT LEARNING OUTCOMES

In this unit, Graduate Attributes are achieved through the following
Learning Outcomes attained by students: On the successful completion of this unit,
students will be able to:

1. Attend and observe a sitting court, engage with and demonstrate an
understanding of the court proceedings.

2. Describe the general principles of criminal liability in relation to
the major substantive criminal offence categories
3. Explain the laws and Acts with most relevance to police (LEPRA).

4. Describe and evaluate the alternatives to a person entering into the
criminal justice system.

5. Develop and demonstrate a basic understanding of Australian Indigenous
Law.

4.0 HOW DO ACTIVITIES AND
ASSESSMENTS RELATE TO LEARNING OUTCOMES?
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At
successful completion of this unit, students will be able to:
• Describe and evaluate the court system through a court visit
• Describe the general principles of criminal liability in relation to
the major substantive criminal offence categories
• Assess the implications of the laws and Acts with most relevance to
police (LEPRA)
• Evaluate the alternatives to court
• Develop basic understanding of Australian Indigenous Law
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5.0 ASSESSMENT OVERVIEW

All three assessment items below are compulsory and must be
completed before you are eligible to pass the unit, regardless of how many
marks you accumulate. In addition, to pass this unit, you must obtain a minimum
overall mark of 50%, aggregated across all weighted assessments.

Detailed
information on each assessment is provided at the end of this Learning
Guide.

Learning Guide 2013-Autumn 101568-Legislation, courts and policing Page 10 of 18

There is a 10% tolerance on all word
limits.

Final marks and grades are subject to confirmation by the School
Assessment Committee which may scale, modify, or otherwise amend the marks and
grades for the unit, as may be required by University policies

Format and Details

Length/Duration

Due Date and Time

ASSESSMENT 1:Court observation report

Weighting:20%

Court Observation Report

1,000 words

BEFORE 4pm on

Friday, 26 April 2013

ASSESSMENT 2:Case study analysis

Weighting:30%

Case Analysis

2,000 words

BEFORE 4pm on

Friday, 24 May 2013

ASSESSMENT 3:Final examination

Weighting:50%

Examination

2 hours

Formal
Examination Period

ASSESSMENT 4:No fourth assessment

Weighting:0%

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6.0 TEXTBOOK(S) AND RESOURCES

6.1 Required textbook(s)
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Mills,B. (2011) The Criminal Trial- Courtroom Practices, Policies and
Procedures: The Federation Press. Sydney.
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6.2 Readings, resources, and web-links

Library resources:

Brown, D., Farrier, D., Neal, D.,
Weisbrot, D. (2001) Criminal Laws: Materials and Commentary on Criminal Law
and Process in New South Wales 3rd edition.Federation Press,
Sydney.

Cunneen, C. 2001, Conflict, Politics and Crime, Aboriginal
Communities and the Police, Allen and Unwin, Sydney

Eterno, J. and Silverman, E. (2005) The New York City Police
Department’s Compstat: dream or nightmare.
International
Journal of Police Science and Management8, 218-231.

Eterno, J. and Silverman, E. (2012) The Crime Numbers Game: Management
by Manipulation. CRC Press, New York.

Findlay, M. 2004, Introducing
Policing: Challenges for Police and Australian Communities, Oxford
University Press: Melbourne

Finnane, M. 1994, Police and Government: Histories of Policing in
Australia, Oxford University Press: Melbourne

Finnane, M. 1999, ‘From Police Force to
Police Service? Aspects of the Recent History of the New South Wales Police’ in
D. Dixon (ed.) A Culture of Corruption: Changing an Australian Police
Service, Federation Press: Sydney, pp. 6-36

Harring, S. & Ray, G. 1999, ‘Policing a Class Society: New York
City in the 1990s’, Social Justice, 26(2), pp. 63-82

Howie, R., Johnson, P. (2005) Annotated
Criminal Legislation New South Wales 2004/2005 ed. Butterworths: Sydney.

Waight, P.K. & Williams, C.R. (1998) Evidence Commentary and
Materials (5th ed.). Lawbook Co.

Jefferson, T. 1996, ‘Race, crime and
policing: empirical, theoretical and methodological issues’, in B. Hudson (ed.)
Race, Crime and Justice, Dartmouth: Brookfield Vt.

Learning
Guide 2013-Autumn 101568-Legislation, courts and policing Page 11 of 18

Odgers, S.
(2006) Uniform Evidence Law (7th ed.). Lawbook Co. Blackmore, A.M. &
Hosking, G.S. (2007) Criminal Law Handbook 2007. Lawbook Co.

Reiner, R. 2000, The Politics of the Police, 3rd Edition,
Oxford University Press: Oxford.

Silverman, E. (1998) Below Zero
Tolerance: The New York Experience. In: Burke, R.H., (Ed.) Zero Tolerance
Policing, pp. 57-67. Perpetuity Press: Leicester.

Silverman, E. (2001) NYPD Battles Crime, Northeastern
University Press: Boston.

Taylor, C. (2004) Surviving the legal system. Coulomb
Communications: Melbourne.

White, R. and Perrone, S. (2010) Crime Criminality & Criminal
Justice. Oxford Uni Press: Melbourne.

Reading list: SEE vUWS

LAW ENFORCEMENT (POWERS AND RESPONSIBILITIES) ACT 2002 – SECT 3

LAW ENFORCEMENT (POWERS AND RESPONSIBILITIES) ACT 2002 – SECT 200
Limitation on exercise of police powers

SUMMARY OFFENCES ACT 1988

Legal Aid Conference August 2007 Law Enforcement (Powers & Responsibilities)
Act

Referencing requirements and assistance:

The referencing requirement for this subject is Harvard Referencing.
Full details of referencing systems can be found at:
http://library.uws.edu.au/citing.phtml. A full range of resources for searching
and citing references is available at:
http://library.uws.edu.au/training.phtml

Key weblinks:

Drive By Shootings Network 10 Part one
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FkhldpZAlqUPart Two http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fyALQSDOplMPart
Three http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yCCcZB3AxSU

http://austlii.law.uts.edu.au/au/legis/nsw/consol_act/leara200245

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